In addition to painting outside, Weir utilized more than one studio in Windham. He probably painted inside the Baker House while courting Anna, or in one of the rooms in another building owned by the family. Before 1904, Weir appears to have set up a studio in the old Elderkin house located south of the Baker property on Jerusalem Road at the intersection of South Street (Route 203), not far from the Windham Center Cemetery. 

Elderkin House

Archival Photo labeled “Weir’s Studio Windham”
Photo courtesy National Park Service
Weir Farm National Historic Site, Wilton, CT

Elderkin House postcard

Elderkin House Postcard
courtesy National Park Service
Weir Farm National Historic Site, Wilton, CT

Photographs in the Weir Farm National Historic Site archives that are labeled, “Weir’s Windham studio,” are identical to a famous postcard of the Elderkin house. The caption on this hand-colored postcard reads, “Col. Elderkin House, Windham, Conn. Said to be the first brick house in this country, bricks brought from Holland.” 14 The Elderkin house was taken down c. 1913-1915. 15
J. Alden Weir in his Windham Studio
J. Alden Weir in his Windham Studio
Weir in his Windham studio

J. Alden Weir in his Windham Studio
Photo courtesy National Park Service
Weir Farm National Historic Site, Wilton, CT

Carpenter working on Weir’s Windham Studio

Carpenter working on Weir’s Windham Studio, 1904
Courtesy L. Tom Perry Special Collections
Harold B. Lee Library
Brigham Young University, Provo, UT

In 1904 Weir built a studio in a field across the street from the Windham Center green on property that was part of the Baker estate. Today the area is located behind the Windham Center fire station. In February of 1904 Weir reported to C.E.S. Wood  “I have given orders to have the studio built at Windham and hope to accomplish a lot of work this summer.” 16
The Spring House

J. Alden Weir, The Spring House, c. 1904-1919
(Private Collection)

"One of the things Weir enjoyed that summer was moving into his new studio. This was an austere wooden, three story building, painted red, that had been  built early in the nineteenth century as a shoe factory. It stood originally on the main street of the village but Weir now had it moved far back in the field with an open field behind it that sloped gently up from town, the second story was taken out, which gave him a big high-ceilinged room, a huge north window was installed for light and on the west side he built an enormous fireplace, that could easily hold six foot logs and which was quite capable of heating the big room during cold weather. The situation was perfect for him, it was only a short walk from his house, and yet set back as it was in the fields, no one came near to bother him unless particularly invited in, and the view from its door step was both enchanting and varied. On two sides there were gentle rolling hills of farming land to be seen, while on the other two sides . . . glimpses of the old houses of Windham Village appeared through the big maple and elm trees that lined the village street. It was a landscape that Weir loved and he painted it innumerable times, from all points of view and under varied weather conditions from early spring to late autumn." 18
View from My Windham Studio and The Spring House, record scenes visible from Weir’s Windham Center studio.  Weir’s 1904 studio was taken down sometime between 1934 and 1951. 19
View from My Windham Studio

J. Alden Weir, View from My Windham Studio, c. 1904-1918
Private Collection, courtesy of The Cooley Gallery, Old Lyme, Connecticut

Interior of J. Alden Weir’s Windham Studio

Interior of J. Alden Weir’s Windham Studio
National Park Service, Weir Farm National Historic Site, Wilton, CT

Windham
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