ONE
1 J. Alden Weir to Anna Dwight Baker, 15 May 1882, National Park Service, Weir Farm National Historic Site.
TWO
2 J. Alden Weir to Anna Dwight Baker, 19 May 1882, National Park Service, Weir Farm National Historic Site.
THREE
3  Hollis Clayson, “Enthralled and Dismayed by Paris: Julian Alden Weir (1852-1919) in the Transatlantic World,” in Marian Wardle, ed., The Weir Family, 1820-1920: Expanding the Traditions of American Art (Provo, Utah: Brigham Young University Museum of Art, 2012), 63. 
FOUR
4  Jamie H. Eves, “Eastern Connecticut Landscapes and the Environment, 1882-1919: The Pastoral as Middle Ground,” June 2014.
FIVE
5 Dorothy Weir Young, The Life and Letters of J. Alden Weir (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1960), 1.
SIX
6 Ayers Gap is located in North Franklin. It is now a nature preserve. “Ayers Gap is a rugged place that conceals an exquisite cascading waterfall amidst crags of exposed rock outcrops. There are flowing brooks, waterfalls, stately hemlocks and the cool, moist aroma of the preserve's interior gorge, also known as Bailey's Ravine. Above the ravine, a blazed trail follows the spine of a ridge, affording a terrific view east across the Franklin countryside.” The Nature Conservancy, October 19, 2013
SEVEN
7 Anna and Julian’s second child and only son, Julian Alden Weir, Jr., born on January 30, 1888, died of diphtheria on March 8, 1889. He died in New York and was buried at Windham Center. State of New York Transit Permit, Windham Town Records, Center for Connecticut Studies, J. Eugene Smith Library, Eastern Connecticut State University. 
EIGHT
8 Anna Dwight Baker to Julian Alden Weir, August 26, 1882, National Park Service, Weir Farm National Historic Site, Wilton, CT.
NINE
9  Dorothy Weir Young Papers, Vault MSS 1291, Box 4, Folder 5, Weir Family Papers, L. Tom Perry Special Collections, Harold B. Lee Library, Brigham Young University. 
TEN
10 Lawrence Willard, “Lou Frink Connecticut Primitive,” Yankee (October 1956): 54-55. I am indebted to Nancy Thorpe for sharing her binder of information on Lou Frink and his paintings. The binder was compiled and written in 1973 by the late Margaret Brockway Ofslager. In addition to the Yankee article and Lyman Allyn Art Museum exhibition brochure, the binder includes an inventory and color reproductions of many Frink paintings. 
ELEVEN
11 Lawrence Willard, “Lou Frink Connecticut Primitive,” Yankee (October 1956):  54-55. 
TWELVE
12  Ibid.
THIRTEEN
13 The Connecticut Historical Society owns the largest collection of Frink paintings.
FOURTEEN
14 The caption is signed Hiram N. Fenn. According to an ad in the February 1899 Storrs Agricultural College Lookout, Fenn ran a picture framing business at 62 Church St. Willimantic. He was also a funeral undertaker. W. M., Nettleton, "S.A.C. Lookout, Volume 3, Number 8, February 1899" (1899). Daily Campus Archives. Paper 25.
http://digitalcommons.uconn.edu/dcamp/25. I am indebted to William Black for directing my attention to this information.
FIFTEEN
15 According to Windham Center Library typed document — Chapter IV “The Past Seventy-Five Years,”  A History of the Village and the First Congregational Church Windham, Connecticut 275th Anniversary 1700-1975, December 10, 1975 — “At the time the church was being remodeled [1915], the Colonel Elderkin house was being torn down. It stood on Jerusalem Road and was said to have been the first brick house in the United States, the bricks having been brought over from Holland.” A reconstruction of Old Windham Street, Conn. 1686-1916 from origianl sources by Theodore A. Bingham, M. A. (Yale), Brig. Gen’l., U. S. Army (retired) (Ciorps of Engineers) states the Elderkin house was torn down in 1913. 
SIXTEEN
16  J. Alden Weir to C.E.S. Wood, 27 February 1904, Dorothy Weir Young scrapbooks, National Park Service, Weir Farm National Historic Site, Wilton, CT.
SEVENTEEN
17 J. Alden Weir to C.E.S. Wood, (month, day not specified)1904, Dorothy Weir Young scrapbooks, National Park Service, Weir Farm National Historic Site, Wilton, CT.
EIGHTEEN
18  Dorothy Weir Young Papers, Vault MSS 1291, Box 4, Folder 3, Weir Family Papers, L. Tom Perry Special Collections, Harold B. Lee Library, Brigham Young University. This passage does not appear in the published version of Young’s biography. For other descriptions of Weir’s 1904 Windham studio see Thomas Whipple Dunbar, “Julian Alden Weir of Ever Increasing Fame,” The Chicago Evening Post, January 13, 1925.
NINETEEN
19  The building is absent from a 1951 aerial photograph. I am indebted to William Black for his assistance in locating and reading these photographs. A local resident remembers seeing Weir’s studio through an open field from her home on East Street (now a section of Rte 14) when she was a child in the 1930s. 
TWENTY
20 Albert Pinkham Ryder to J. Alden Weir, September 23, 1903. Dorothy Weir Young Papers, Vault MSS 1291, Weir Family Papers, L. Tom Perry Special Collections, Harold B. Lee Library, Brigham Young University. 
TWENTY-ONE
21 Young, Life and Letters, 221.
TWENTY-TWO
22 Ibid, 259
TWENTY-THREE
23 “Dear Weir, Can you come down and see this old timer and stay a few days. Metcalf is here and has been working hard. The laurel has been superb. I wish you could have seen it.” Hassam from Old Lyme, Conn July 3rd, 1905, Childe Hassam Papers, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. 
TWENTY-FOUR
24 I am grateful to Kathleen Burnside for sharing this information. She suggests this painting may be the 1905 work now titled American Elm that is owned by the Arkell Museum, Canajoharie, New York.
TWENTY-FIVE
25 Carlsen wrote on the back of a photograph of the painting, “Afternoon Landscape, painted J. Alden Weir’s property about 1907 one of my very finest pictures Emil Carlsen.” Information courtesy of Thomas Colville.

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